Bees in trees

Bees are responsible for the production of approximately one-third of the food we eat. Accordingly, their decline has received attention in the media as well as in conservation biology. While the honey bee (Apis mellifera) is the species most people are familiar with, there are over 400 bee species native to New England. The honey […]

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Student research highlight

Check out Providence College’s most recent Student Research Highlight to learn about what Environmental Biology major Alexa Pudlo has been working on in the lab! You can read more about Alexa’s work on Westerly Land Trust properties in her blog post from last summer. Video bonus: Keep an eye out for a bumble bee with […]

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Valentine’s Day publication!

Read my newest publication in Insectes Sociaux to learn how burning affects the ground-foraging ant community on a Pacific Northwest grassland prairie! Be sure to visit the supplement for focus-stacked photos of the most common ant species taken with help from my Providence College colleague James Waters, and Tufts University alum Max McCarthy! Full article […]

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Frosted elfin work headed to the BIG EAST Undergraduate Research Symposium!

This March, Providence College is participating in the Inaugural BIG EAST Undergraduate Research Symposium at Madison Square Garden in New York City. Each BIG EAST school was invited to send five research projects–and Isabelle Heron was chosen as one of Providence College’s projects! Isabelle will present her work on frosted elfin habitat surveys, which was […]

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Bees and Butterflies with Dr. B (Part 2)

You can now watch Part 2 of my PC Experts interview, just in time for the end of summer break here at Providence College! Learn about where my lab does fieldwork, how you can help #savethebees (shoutout to Tufts Pollinator Initiative and The Pollinator Partnership!), and how you can help my lab collect insect pollinator […]

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Pollinator research at Westerly Land Trust

Post written by Aelxa Pudlo Alexa is a rising senior majoring in Environmental Biology at Providence College and a Walsh Student Research Fellow. Unlike the well known honey bee, many wild bee species are solitary and do not live in a colony with thousands of their relatives. Solitary (and sometimes semi-social, or gregarious) bees burrow into the ground […]

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